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Frequently Asked Questions

As the leading residential management company in Dublin the professionals at Dublin Property Management have seen and done it all. By managing 100's of properties our executive staff and team have managed all types of crises and most importantly, devised long-term solutions and action plans to handle such occurrences and prevent them wherever possible.



How much notice do I have to give tenants?

Duration of Tenancy    Notice by Landlord
Less than 6 months 28 days
6 or more months but less than 1 year 35 days
1 year or more but less than 2 years 42 days
2 years or more but less than 3 years 56 days
3 years or more but less than 4 years 84 days
4 or more years 112 days

 

How much notice do tenants have to give landlords?

 

If you want to terminate your tenancy and move out of your property, you must give the landlord/DPM notice in writing.

A tenant who does not serve the landlord/DPM with formal written notice endangers their deposit. If a written lease is in place, the tenant could also be held liable for the remainder of the rent owed for the rest of the lease period.

The length of notice given by a tenant depends on how long the tenant has lived in the property. The longer the tenancy, the longer the notice period. Please note the notice periods provided in the Residential Tenancies Act as laid out in the Table below.

 

Duration of tenancy Notice by tenant
Less than 6 months 28 days
6 or more months but less than 1 year 35 days
1 year or more but less than 2 years 42 days
2 or more years 56 days

 

NB* A tenant cannot avail of the notice periods where they are bound by a fixed term lease which they signed.They can, however, end the tenancy where the landlord is in breach of an obligation and where they have written to the landlord regarding the breach and giving the landlord an opportunity to rectify the position.

What are tenants obligations?

 

Certain minimum obligations are laid out in the Residential Tenancies Act 2004.  Failure to comply with any of these obligations could result in the termination of the tenancy subject to the landlords compliance with the act.
Under the Residential Tenancies Act 2004 tenants must:

Tenants must:

  • Pay the rent and any other specified charges.
  • Avoid causing or make good any damage beyond normal wear and tear.
  • Notify the landlord/ DPM of any repair requirements.
  • Allow access for repairs to be carried out and by appointment for routine inspections.
  • Keep the landlord /DPM informed of the identity of the occupants.
  • Not engage in or allow anti-social behavior.
  • Not act, or allow visitors to act in a way that would invalidate the landlord's insurance.
  • Not cause the landlord to be in breach of statutory obligations.
  • Not alter, improve, assign, sub-let or change the use of the dwelling without written consent from the landlord or DPM.
  • Provide the landlord/DPM with the information required so as to register the tenancy with the Private Residential Tenancies Board (PRTB)
     
What is a sub-tenancy?

 

When a tenant moves out of a dwelling and becomes landlord (in effect) to a new sub-tenant. That tenant must obtain the consent of his or her landlord before creating a sub-tenancy. The tenancy commencement date will be the same date as the date that the original tenancy commenced on.

What is a Personal Public Service Number (PPSN)?

 

PPSN (formerly known as RSI number) is unique to each individual and is used to distinguish between individuals with similar names or addresses. The PPSN must be provided for each person as required on the form. However if as a landlord, or an agent acting on behalf of a landlord, you have made a reasonable effort to obtain the PPSN of a tenant but it has not been provided, or alternatively the tenant does not have a PPSN, this should be noted as appropriate on the registration application.

You must not use a PPSN assigned to one person for a different person.
Please note that it is in a landlord's interest to obtain a PPSN for a tenant as if there is subsequently a dispute it may facilitate the PRTB in obtaining an address for a tenant.

The PPSN is usually identified on tax and welfare statements and P60s. If you do not have a PPSN number please contact your local Department of Social Protection (DSP) office. Use of the PPSN is governed by law. The PPSN Code of Practice is available from the DSP and on their website

Tenants, avoid being conned

 

A spate of apartment scams in Dublin has highlighted the need to be vigilant when you are looking to rent. Save yourself €2,000 or more by reading these tips:

  1. Always meet a prospective landlord / Agent in the accommodation
  2. Ask for identification
  3. Get the landlord's / Agents  full contact details, including a landline telephone number, home address or place of business.
  4. Always get a proper receipt, for example, on headed paper or a till receipt. A scrap of paper will not do.
  5. If you are suspicious in any way, contact the Gardaí immediately.


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Excellent 3 bedroom home to let within easy access to the city centre and Drumcondra; close to numerous bus routes. 


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